Ep. 13 – My Week in Press (3)

my-week-in-press

Hey there you guys! I’m back with a weekly round up of nearly all the amazing things I’ve read on the internet this week. Maybe you’ll enjoy some of these articles as you’re sipping you nice cup of tea and savouring your delicious smoothie bowl in your PJs! Happy Sunday!

 

Monday:

Tuesday:

Leandra Medine shines light on what it’s really like to get older (well, in her view at least). This article is about how your mind view of ageing evolves over the years and decades, and how you should react when you start seeing the physical (and mental) signs of ageing.

When you’re young, you imagine that when you get old, you’re going to take it on all so graceefully – because rational as you are, you know there’s nothing you can do to stop the process of time. But then again… is there?, you start (disillusionally) wondering as you notice that first wrinkle coming in. Could modern science do the magic we need it to do to stop the appearance of time?

For Leandra, it could. She’s thought thoroughly about it. But do you really want to stop your body from being who it is and what it does? Do you really want to sweep the appearance the extra years you’ve taken on under the rug? Could you live with yourself knowing that you’ve messed with the effects of time passing?

It’s basically just another one of those dilemmas: stay wrinkle free for a few more years (or decades) masking the fact that you’re ageing, or age gracefully and honestly, and look exactly how you were meant to at your age. Views of Botox are often very different. And Botox is very tempting, especially for women, because lets be honest, most people judge a woman by her appearance more than anything else (often times).

But the final truth will always remain, no matter what you do, and Botox doesn’t fix all the “problems” of ageing. No matter which side of the spectrum you are (pro or anti-botox), you will inevitably feel the test of time. There’s nothing you can do, and your control-freak-do-i-need-botox mind has to come to terms with that.

At 20 years old, we’re naïve or innocent enough to believe that we’re going to accept getting old gracefully. But the years leave marks and wrinkles. And thankfully, marks of wisdom. But we often are submerged by the belief, or the fear, that everything goes down hill the minute you turn 30. Or at least, that’s what we tell ourselves. (Maybe if we spent less time worrying about ageing, we wouldn’t have so many wrinkles!)

But what we seem to automatically forget the moment we hit the higher age groups, is that ageing also comes with great wisdom. As Leandra Medine put it, “Decades grace us with their wisdom at different stages.”.

And quoting the end of her post, because it sums it up all so well…

“You hit the social basics between ages 7 and 9, the formative years of learning your cues. You are your most emotionally fertile between 15 and 17. And by the time you hit 28? You are practically emerging from an existential birth canal wherein you think you know yourself, you realize you don’t, you start learning yourself and then…I don’t know, I’m still in the birth canal. I’ll keep you posted. In the meantime, I am probably not going to get Botox. It feels like reacting to a headline without actually having read the article. An inkling of emotional response, but not enough information.”

 

Wednesday:

Thursday:

Friday:

Saturday: